Foucalt and the connected city: How Information and Communication Technologies Influence Urban Governance and Citizenship
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Keywords

Foucault
biopolitics
ICT
urban governance
knowledge production
citizenship
governmentality Foucault
biopolítica
TICs
gobernanza urbana
producción de conocimiento
ciudadanía
gubernamentalidad

How to Cite

Haumann, E. (2020). Foucalt and the connected city: How Information and Communication Technologies Influence Urban Governance and Citizenship. InForma, 13, 194-207. Retrieved from https://revistas.upr.edu/index.php/informa/article/view/18423

Abstract

Over the last centuries, the worldwide competition amongst cities has increased, as they vie for capital, knowledge, and production. In order to keep their status as important economic, political, and cultural centers, as well as hubs for innovation, cities increasingly turn towards new information and communications technologies (ICTs). Cities hope to, simultaneously, achieve sustainability, economic growth, and a general improvement of the quality of life. Within these processes, private companies gain immense influence because of their roles as suppliers of technology and accumulators of data. Citizens are at the heart of every city and, therefore, they are the most affected by the changes instigated by the increased use of technology as well as subsequent data-based forms of governance and knowledge production. This paper offers an assessment of the current conditions of these changes utilizing Michel Foucault’s concept of biopolitics. This concept offers the aspects of power, knowledge, and subjectivity to explain potential negative and counterproductive implications of urban ICT use. The analysis here reveals the daunting amount of influence over citizens, gained by private corporations; and how this influence
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