Hidden in Plain Sight: The Conspicuous Absence of Personal Life in the Modernist Narrative of Domestic Space
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Supplementary Files

View of the front porte-cochere at The Homewood (JPEG)
Ursula Goldfinger's canvasses and easel (JPEG)

Keywords

architecture
design
modernism
dwelling
house museums
domesticity
London

How to Cite

Rammohan, M. S. (2018). Hidden in Plain Sight: The Conspicuous Absence of Personal Life in the Modernist Narrative of Domestic Space. InForma, 53-59. Retrieved from https://revistas.upr.edu/index.php/informa/article/view/15975

Abstract

Often associated with the feminine, the domestic realm has always been a problematic area for Modern architecture, which has favored a more masculine oriented viewpoint. While many theorists have argued that Modernist architecture has produced buildings and spaces with predominant masculine attributes, this essay discusses how Modernism changed the way we evaluate space itself-glossing over the personal, lived aspect of domestic and disregarding problematic areas of lived experience, to show a homogenous, universal ideal of living. Using physical encounters with buildings as the principal mode of research, the essay discusses three domestic spaces in and around London that have been preserved and exhibited as museums: The Leighton, 2 Willow Road, and The Homewood.
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