Antartica, the Archive, and Anamorphic Landscapes: Oblique Approaches to Architecture Through Art
PDF (Español (España))

Supplementary Files

Figure 1 (JPEG)
Figure 2 (JPEG)

Keywords

architecture
Antarctica
art
epistemology
mapping
watercolor
glasswork
19th century

How to Cite

Gould, P. (2018). Antartica, the Archive, and Anamorphic Landscapes: Oblique Approaches to Architecture Through Art. InForma, 44-47. Retrieved from https://revistas.upr.edu/index.php/informa/article/view/15972

Abstract

In this essay, Gould reflects upon her practice as an artist and her recent research into the historical archives of Antarctic exploration. Gould considers her mirrored glass globes and glass painted with watercolor landscapes, and pinboard assemblages of a newly made archive. She writes about the use of topographical watercolor as a tool of colonization of global space in nineteenth century exploration. The epistemologies and practices of looking are present in the development of longitude and latitude, in mapping and survey practices, in the conceptualization of climate zones, and in the practices of documentation and representation that accompany these. Gould proposes that these naturalized epistemic methods are best made manifest through an oblique, sideways approach that she likens to anamorphic projection, arguing that architecture can be approached via art to open up new points of view and hybrid thinking.
PDF (Español (España))
Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.